No Animals Were Harmed

no animals were harmed

If you’ve ever watched a movie and seen “no animals were harmed in the making of this movie” the chances of it being true are slim to none. It’s more than a few bumps and bruises, its animals with lacerations and sometimes, dead.

On April 7, 2011 an email was sent from Gina Johnson, the American Humane Association monitor during the filming of Life of pi, stating “we almost f***ing killed King in the water… I have down played the f*** out of it.”

Another movie that has been accused with animal abuse is The Hobbit. According to The Huffington Post 27 animals died due to the production company neglecting them, including sheep and goats that died from dehydration and exhaustion or from drowning in water-filled gullies.

Most of their deaths were due to where they were being kept, a farm filled with bluffs, sinkholes and other “death traps.”

The AHS said again, that no animals were harmed during the actual filming; however, they fail to mention the condition of the animals off the set and the environment they were kept in. They only showed what was happening on stage.

According to The hollywoodreporter.com “a husky dog was repeatedly punched in the diaphragm during the filming of Eight Below.” Later during the filming of Failure to launch a chipmunk was squashed to death on set. All these deaths were covered up by the AHS as well. Then this happened once more during the filming of Pirates of the Caribbean.

After the filming of the canceled HBO show Luck, THR’s investigation, drawing on internal information obtained from AHA sources, found that the horse deaths could have been avoidable.

Barbara Casey, the Studio City-based Film & TV Unit’s former head of production sued AHA (American humane association) for trying to cover up Steven Spielberg. Casey later said, “…AHA agreed to cover up the death of [a] horse [on War Horse] and to give the 2011 film its ‘No Animals Were Harmed’ end credit.”

This just proves that the AHS is doing a better job of covering up these incidents rather than preventing them.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s